Monastery Quality Buddhist Statue of Disciple Full Fire Gold plated , Painted Face

In stock
Export
SKU
HME21860
$412.50
Monastery Quality Buddhist Statue of Disciple Full Fire Gold plated , Painted Face code: HME21860 Weight : 2.14 Kg(s) size :20x14x9 Cm
Shipping Term :
FOB
Unit Of Measure:
Pcs
Package Weight:
2.14 kgs
Min Order Qty:
1
Max Order Qty:
1
Available Stock:
1
More Information
Product TagsMonastery Quality Statue, Disciple Statue, Buddhist Statue Gold Plated Statue, Painted Face Statue, Metal Craft, Idol, Sculpture, Statue
Country: Nepal

Monastery Quality Buddhist Statue of Disciple Full Fire Gold plated Painted Face


Weight: 2.14 kg
Size: 20x14x9 cm
Material: Copper Gold plated


About the Product

Face: Gold Painted



Protecting the Face
As the face is painted it is highly recommended that the face of the statue is to be greatly taken care of as it requires a very professional and skilled face artist to repair the face of dirt and damages. Commonly to protect it from damage the statue with painted face is placed under a glass box and it is always covered with a cotton face mask if it has to be moved

Video of Face Painting



Finishing: Full Fire Gold Gilded



Detailed Description of Mercury Gilding - Source wikipedia
Fire-gilding or Wash-gilding is a process by which an amalgam of gold is applied to metallic surfaces the mercury being subsequently volatilized leaving a film of gold or an amalgam containing 13 to 16% mercury. In the preparation of the amalgam the gold must first be reduced to thin plates or grains which are heated red-hot and thrown into previously heated mercury until it begins to smoke. When the mixture is stirred with an iron rod the gold is totally absorbed. The proportion of mercury to gold is generally six or eight to one. When the amalgam is cold it is squeezed through chamois leather to separate the superfluous mercury; the gold with about twice its weight of mercury remains behind forming a yellowish silvery mass with the consistency of butter.

When the metal to be gilded is wrought or chased it ought to be covered with mercury before the amalgam is applied that this may be more easily spread; but when the surface of the metal is plain the amalgam may be applied to it directly. When no such preparation is applied the surface to be gilded is simply bitten and cleaned with nitric acid. A deposit of mercury is obtained on a metallic surface using quicksilver water a solution of mercury(II) nitrate the nitric acid attacking the metal to which it is applied and thus leaving a film of free metallic mercury.

The amalgam is equally spread over the prepared surface of the metal the mercury is then sublimed by heat just sufficient for that purpose; for if it is too great part of the gold may be driven off or it may run together and leave some of the surface of the metal bare. When the mercury has evaporated which is known by the surface having entirely become of a dull yellow color the metal must undergo other operations by which the fine gold color is given to it. First the gilded surface is rubbed with a scratch brush of brass wire until its surface is smooth.

It is then covered with gilding wax and again exposed to fire until the wax is burnt off. Gilding wax is composed of beeswax mixed with some of the following substances: red ochre verdigris copper scales alum vitriol and borax. By this operation the color of the gilding is heightened and the effect seems to be produced by a perfect dissipation of some mercury remaining after the former operation. The gilt surface is then covered over with potassium nitrate alum or other salts ground together and mixed into a paste with water or weak ammonia. The piece of metal thus covered is exposed to heat and then quenched in water.

By this method its color is further improved and brought nearer to that of gold probably by removing any particles of copper that may have been on the gilt surface. This process when skillfully carried out produces gilding of great solidity and beauty but owing to the exposure of the workmen to mercurial fumes it is very unhealthy. There is also much loss of mercury to the atmosphere which brings extremely serious environmental concerns as well.

This method of gilding metallic objects was formerly widespread but fell into disuse as the dangers of mercury toxicity became known. Since fire-gilding requires that the mercury be volatilized to drive off the mercury and leave the gold behind on the surface it is extremely dangerous. Breathing the fumes generated by this process can quickly result in serious health problems such as neurological damage and endocrine disorders since inhalation is a very efficient route for mercuric compounds to enter the body. This process has generally been supplanted by the electroplating of gold over a nickel substrate which is more economical and less dangerous.

Fire Gold Plating In Nepal


Making Process: Lost-Wax System




Tsongkhapa: Brief Introduction

Tsongkhapa ("The man from Tsongkha" [1] 1357–1419) usually taken to mean "the Man from Onion Valley" born in Amdo [2] was a famous teacher of Tibetan Buddhism whose activities led to the formation of the Gelug school of Tibetan Buddhism. He is also known by his ordained name Losang Drakpa (Wylie: blo bzang grags pa) or simply as "Je Rinpoche" (Wylie: rje rin po che). Also he is known by Chinese as Zongkapa Lobsang Zhaba [2] He was the son of a Tibetan Longben Tribal leader who also once served as an official of the Yuan Dynasty of China.[2]


In his two main treatises the Lamrim Chenmo (Wylie: lam rim chen mo) and Ngakrim Chenmo (Wylie: sngags rim chen mo) Tsongkhapa meticulously sets forth this graduated way and how one establishes oneself in the paths of sutra and tantra.Life HistoryEarly Life
With a Mongolian father and a Tibetan mother Tsongkhapa was born into a nomadic family in the walled city of Tsongkha in Amdo Tibet (present-day Haidong and Xining Qinghai) in 1357. It is said that the Buddha Sakyamuni spoke of his coming as an emanation of the Bodhisattva Manjusri in the short verse from the Root Tantra of Manjushri (Wylie: 'jam dpal rtsa rgyud):

After I pass away
And my pure doctrine is absent
You will appear as an ordinary being
Performing the deeds of a Buddha
And establishing the Joyful Land the great Protector
In the Land of the Snows.[3]

According to hagiographic accounts Tsongkhapa's birth was prophesied by the 12th abbot of the Snar thang monastery and was recognized as such at a young age taking the lay vows at the age of three before Rolpe Dorje 4th Karmapa Lama and was named Künga Nyingpo (Wylie: kun dga' snying po).[4] At the age of seven he was ordained as a śrāmaṇera by Döndrup Rinchen (Wylie: don grub rin chen 1309–1385) the first abbott of Jakhyung Monastery (Wylie: bya khyung brag) and was given the ordination name Losang Drakpa (Wylie: blo bzang grags pa).

Monastic career
It was at this early age that he was able to receive the empowerments of Heruka Hevajra and Yamantaka three of the most prominent wrathful deities of Tibetan Buddhism as well as being able to recite a great many Sutras not the least of which was Mañjuśrīnāmasamgīti. He would go on to be a great student of the vinaya the doctrine of behaviour and even later of the Six Yogas of Naropa the Kalachakra tantra and the practice of Mahamudra. At the age of 24 he received full ordination as a monk of the Sakya school.

From Zhönnu Lodrö (Wylie: gzhon nu blo gros) and Rendawa (Wylie: red mda' pa) he received the lineage of the Pramanavarttika transmitted by Sakya Pandita.[5] He mastered all the courses of study at Drigung kagyud Monastery in Ü-Tsang.[5]

As an emanation of Manjusri Tsongkhapa is said have been of "one mind" with Atiśa [6] received the Kadam lineages and studied the major Sarma tantras under Sakya and Kagyu masters.[5] He also studied with a Nyingma teacher the siddha Lek gyi Dorjé (Wylie: legs gyi rdo rje) and the abbot of Shalu Monastery Chö kyi Pel (Wylie: zhwa lus pa chos kyi dpal) [5] and his main Dzogchen master was Drupchen Lekyi Dorje (Wylie: grub chen las kyi rdo je) also known as Namkha Gyaltsen (Wylie: nam mkha' rgyal mtshan 1326–1401).[7]

In addition to his studies he engaged in extensive meditation retreats. He is reputed to have performed millions of prostrations mandala offerings and other forms of purification practice. Tsongkhapa often had visions of iṣṭadevatās especially of Manjusri with whom he would communicate directly to clarify difficult points of the scriptures.

Monastic career
It was at this early age that he was able to receive the empowerments of Heruka Hevajra and Yamantaka three of the most prominent wrathful deities of Tibetan Buddhism as well as being able to recite a great many Sutras not the least of which was Mañjuśrīnāmasamgīti. He would go on to be a great student of the vinaya the doctrine of behaviour and even later of the Six Yogas of Naropa the Kalachakra tantra and the practice of Mahamudra. At the age of 24 he received full ordination as a monk of the Sakya school.

From Zhönnu Lodrö (Wylie: gzhon nu blo gros) and Rendawa (Wylie: red mda' pa) he received the lineage of the Pramanavarttika transmitted by Sakya Pandita.[5] He mastered all the courses of study at Drigung kagyud Monastery in Ü-Tsang.[5]

As an emanation of Manjusri Tsongkhapa is said have been of "one mind" with Atiśa [6] received the Kadam lineages and studied the major Sarma tantras under Sakya and Kagyu masters.[5] He also studied with a Nyingma teacher the siddha Lek gyi Dorjé (Wylie: legs gyi rdo rje) and the abbot of Shalu Monastery Chö kyi Pel (Wylie: zhwa lus pa chos kyi dpal) [5] and his main Dzogchen master was Drupchen Lekyi Dorje (Wylie: grub chen las kyi rdo je) also known as Namkha Gyaltsen (Wylie: nam mkha' rgyal mtshan 1326–1401).[7]

In addition to his studies he engaged in extensive meditation retreats. He is reputed to have performed millions of prostrations mandala offerings and other forms of purification practice. Tsongkhapa often had visions of iṣṭadevatās especially of Manjusri with whom he would communicate directly to clarify difficult points of the scriptures.


Tsongkhapa died in 1419 at the age of sixty-two. After his death several biographies were written by Lamas of different traditions.[9] Wangchuk Dorje 9th Karmapa Lama praised Tsongkhapa as one "who swept away wrong views with the correct and perfect ones."[9] Mikyö Dorje 8th Karmapa Lama wrote in his poem In Praise of the Incomparable Tsong Khapa:

When the teachings of the Sakya Kagyue Kadam
And Nyingma sects in Tibet were declining
You O Tsong Khapa revived Buddha's Doctrine
Hence I sing this praise to you of Ganden Mountain.[10]

Write Your Own Review
Only registered users can write reviews. Please Sign in or create an account
You may also like