Nepali Handmade Statue Of White Mahakala, Partly Gold Plated

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Nepali Handmade Statue Of White Mahakala, Partly Gold Plated code: HME22390 Weight : 3.13 Kg(s) size :24x13x8 Cm
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Product TagsHandmade, Handicraft, Craft, Statue, Gold Plated, Mahakala, White Mahakala
Seller Countries: Nepal

Nepali Handmade Statue Of White Mahakala Partly Gold Plated

Weight: 3.13 kg
Size: 24x13x8 cm
Material: Copper Gold Plated


About the Product

Finishing: Partly Gold Plated



Detailed Description of Mercury Gilding - Source wikipedia
Fire-gilding or Wash-gilding is a process by which an amalgam of gold is applied to metallic surfaces the mercury being subsequently volatilized leaving a film of gold or an amalgam containing 13 to 16% mercury. In the preparation of the amalgam the gold must first be reduced to thin plates or grains which are heated red-hot and thrown into previously heated mercury until it begins to smoke. When the mixture is stirred with an iron rod the gold is totally absorbed. The proportion of mercury to gold is generally six or eight to one. When the amalgam is cold it is squeezed through chamois leather to separate the superfluous mercury; the gold with about twice its weight of mercury remains behind forming a yellowish silvery mass with the consistency of butter.

When the metal to be gilded is wrought or chased it ought to be covered with mercury before the amalgam is applied that this may be more easily spread; but when the surface of the metal is plain the amalgam may be applied to it directly. When no such preparation is applied the surface to be gilded is simply bitten and cleaned with nitric acid. A deposit of mercury is obtained on a metallic surface using quicksilver water a solution of mercury(II) nitrate the nitric acid attacking the metal to which it is applied and thus leaving a film of free metallic mercury.

The amalgam is equally spread over the prepared surface of the metal the mercury is then sublimed by heat just sufficient for that purpose; for if it is too great part of the gold may be driven off or it may run together and leave some of the surface of the metal bare. When the mercury has evaporated which is known by the surface having entirely become of a dull yellow color the metal must undergo other operations by which the fine gold color is given to it. First the gilded surface is rubbed with a scratch brush of brass wire until its surface is smooth.

It is then covered with gilding wax and again exposed to fire until the wax is burnt off. Gilding wax is composed of beeswax mixed with some of the following substances: red ochre verdigris copper scales alum vitriol and borax. By this operation the color of the gilding is heightened and the effect seems to be produced by a perfect dissipation of some mercury remaining after the former operation. The gilt surface is then covered over with potassium nitrate alum or other salts ground together and mixed into a paste with water or weak ammonia. The piece of metal thus covered is exposed to heat and then quenched in water.

By this method its color is further improved and brought nearer to that of gold probably by removing any particles of copper that may have been on the gilt surface. This process when skillfully carried out produces gilding of great solidity and beauty but owing to the exposure of the workmen to mercurial fumes it is very unhealthy. There is also much loss of mercury to the atmosphere which brings extremely serious environmental concerns as well.

This method of gilding metallic objects was formerly widespread but fell into disuse as the dangers of mercury toxicity became known. Since fire-gilding requires that the mercury be volatilized to drive off the mercury and leave the gold behind on the surface it is extremely dangerous. Breathing the fumes generated by this process can quickly result in serious health problems such as neurological damage and endocrine disorders since inhalation is a very efficient route for mercuric compounds to enter the body. This process has generally been supplanted by the electroplating of gold over a nickel substrate which is more economical and less dangerous.

Fire Gold Plating In Nepal

 

White Mahakala: Brief Introduction

Mahakala a wrathful deity is considered to be the fierce and powerful emanation of Avalokiteshvara the bodhisattva of compassion. This tutelary deity is one of the Dharmapalas in Vajrayana Buddhism who defend the Dharma from corruption and degeneration and from forces hostile to it; to keep the site of the ritual free from impure thoughts and actions; to guide and protect the individual practitioner from all kinds of deception and delusion; bestow the power to overcome life struggles; and to eliminate oneÂ’s obstacles and impediment that hinders.

Every evening at the monastery offering pujas to the great protector Mahakala and entourage are performed in the evening. At the end of every year it is traditional for all tibetan monasteries to perform the year-end Mahakala Grand Puja and Sacred Dance.Iconography On White MahakalaThe Six-armed Mahakala is favored by the Gelug order of Tibetan Buddhism and in this manifestation is considered to be a fierce and powerful emanation of Avalokiteśvara the bodhisattva of compassion.

He is adorned with the following symbolic attributes:
A crown of five skulls: This is worn by all manifestations of Mahakala and represents the transmutation of the five negative afflictions of human nature into positive virtues.
The Six Arms signify the successful completion of the six perfections which are practiced and brought to perfection by bodhisattvas during the course of their training.
The arms hold various implements each of which has a symbolic significance. The first right hand holds a curved knife. In Mahakala's symbolism the curved knife cuts through the life veins of enemies such as oath-breakers and hindering spirits.

The skull cup in his primary left hand is filled with the heart-blood of these enemies. The crescent shaped chopper of the right hand corresponds in shape to the cavity of the skull cup and functions to make 'mincemeat' of the hearts intestines lungs and life-veins of enemies hostile to the Dharma which are then collected in the skull cup. A similar crescent shaped hand cleaver is used in oriental cuisine to chop meat and dice vegetables.

The next right hand holds a damaru - the hourglass-shaped drum signifying the primordial sound from which is said to have originated all manifested existence. Its rattle is also said to emanate the sound that arouses us from our ignorant state coaxing us on to the path of Dharma.
The uppermost right hand holds a rosary of skulls. The continuous counting of the rosary is a symbol of perpetual activity which Mahakala achieves on a cosmic scale.

Another left hand holds a trident which represents the Three Jewels of Buddhism the Buddha the Dharma and the Sangha.Finally there is the noose for lassoing those of us who have strayed away from the path of the Dharma.

His left leg is outstretched while the right is bent at the knee. The former symbolizes his accomplishments for the benefit of others and the latter those for himself. An elephant-headed entity lying crushed under his legs represents our instinctive primary animal force and urge which when unleashed can prove to be extremely destructive. The sun-disc on which Mahakala stands denotes his illumination of the darkness of ignorance and the lotus on which this disc rests signifies his undefiled purity.

The blazing fire surrounding him demonstrates his powerful energy out to consume all neurotic states of minds. Further his three organs of vision express his ability to see the past present and future. That he stares at the world with wide eyes signifies that he is incensed at the current state of affairs.

Snakes slither across his body as ornaments and also as the scared thread of Brahmins. The writhing serpent is a metaphor for the stirring of our psychic instinctive and primordial energy and Mahakala's wearing them as adornments expresses the fact that rather than impede our spiritual progress such emotions have been tamed and harnessed becoming in the process crowning glories of our spiritual achievements.About White MahakalaWhite Mahakala is rare form of the wrathful Buddhist deity. He is associated with the attainment of wealth. The following description is according to his sadhana:
His body is white. His face is wrathful and he has three eyes. He has six arms. His main right hand holds a wish- fulfilling jewel mounted on a jewel-tipped handle in front of his chest. This emblem is held by deities associated particularly with wealth.

His upper right hand holds a chopper. This crescent-shaped chopper corresponds in shape to the cavity of the skullcup and functions to make 'mincemeat' of the hearts intestines lungs and life-veins of enemies hostile to the Dharma. A similar crescent-shaped hand cleaver is used in oriental cuisine to chop meat and dice vegetables.

His lower right arm holds a hand drum damaru in Sanskrit (Tib. Da ma ru rnga chung). According to the strict rules of Tibetan-Buddhist iconography the damaru is held and played in the right hand and its function is to summon or invoke all of the Buddhas inspiring them with supreme joy. The damaru as held by wrathful and semi-wrathful Buddhist deities is described as being fashioned from the joined skulls of a fifteen or sixteen-year old boy and girl. The left side of the double-skull damaru is drawn smaller to represent the pubescent girl's skull. The magical qualities possessed by these skulls symbolize the virginal ripening to fullness of the male and female bodhichitta essences.

His lower left arm holds a skull-cup with a vase in it filled with many jewels. The skull-cup (Skt. Kapala; Tib. Thod phur)- fashioned from the oval upper section of a human cranium serves as a libation vessel for wrathful and protective Vajrayana deities. As a receptacle for sacrificial offerings presented to wrathful deities the kapala parallels the precious tray or bowl containing auspicious substances like the jewels shown here in this painting.

The central right hand holds a vajra hook. As a hand held weapon the vajra hook symbolizes the hooking of negativities or evil beings and the pulling or driving of all beings out of samsara and towards liberation.

The uppermost left hand holds a trident. As a weapon the trident symbolizes the destruction of the three poisons of ignorance desire and aggression within the three realms. The two prongs uniting in the flaming central prong also symbolize the unity of method and wisdom; the abandonment of the two extremes of samsara and nirvana; and the ultimate union of absolute and relative truth.

He is adorned with jewelled ornaments and wears a beautiful skirt made of many scarves with jewels hanging down on the skirt.

Under each of his foot is a prostrate deity with an elephant head. This is symbolic of Lord Ganesha the Hindu Lord of obstacles thus representing the overcoming of obstacles.

Even though stationary in his stance a lively movement is imparted through the agitated postures of his arms and the "Art-Nouveau" curves of his floating scarves.

The White Mahakala is more unusual than the customary black form. He is especially popular in Mongolia as the main protector deity of Mongolia. given such distinction by the third Dalai Lama.

The teachings of the White Mahakala were brought to Tibet in the eleventh century by Khedrup Khyungpopa who also brought the teachings of the Six-armed Black Mahakala.

Performing the White Mahakala ritual is supposed to bring endless wealth to the needy practitioner in such things as family material goods food power knowledge and spirituality.

Mantra of Mahakala

OM GURU MAHAKALA HARI NI SA SIDDHI DZA

 

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