Statue of Red Jambala with Real Stone Setting

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HME22320
$80.00
Statue of Red Jambala with Real Stone Setting code: HME22320 Weight : 1.74 Kg(s) size :16x13x9 Cm
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FOB
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Pcs
Package Weight:
1.74 kgs
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1
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1
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1
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Product TagsHandmade, Handicraft, Craft, Statue, Red Jambala, Jambala, Red Jambala with Real Stone
Seller Countries: Nepal

Statue of Red Jambala with Real Stone Setting


Weight: 1.74 kg
Size: 16x13x9 cm
Material: Brass and Stone


About the Product

Finishing: Stone Setting

Process: Sand Casting



The process cycle for sand casting consists of six main stages which are explained below
Mold-making -The first step in the sand casting process is to create the mold for the casting. In an expendable mold process this step must be performed for each casting. A sand mold is formed by packing sand into each half of the mold. The sand is packed around the pattern which is a replica of the external shape of the casting. When the pattern is removed the cavity that will form the casting remains. Any internal features of the casting that cannot be formed by the pattern are formed by separate cores which are made of sand prior to the formation of the mold. Further details on mold-making will be described in the next section. The mold-making time includes positioning the pattern packing the sand and removing the pattern. The mold-making time is affected by the size of the part the number of cores and the type of sand mold. If the mold type requires heating or baking time the mold-making time is substantially increased. Also lubrication is often applied to the surfaces of the mold cavity in order to facilitate removal of the casting. The use of a lubricant also improves the flow the metal and can improve the surface finish of the casting. The lubricant that is used is chosen based upon the sand and molten metal temperature.

Clamping - Once the mold has been made it must be prepared for the molten metal to be poured. The surface of the mold cavity is first lubricated to facilitate the removal of the casting. Then the cores are positioned and the mold halves are closed and securely clamped together. It is essential that the mold halves remain securely closed to prevent the loss of any material.
Pouring - The molten metal is maintained at a set temperature in a furnace. After the mold has been clamped the molten metal can be ladled from its holding container in the furnace and poured into the mold. The pouring can be performed manually or by an automated machine. Enough molten metal must be poured to fill the entire cavity and all channels in the mold. The filling time is very short in order to prevent early solidification of any one part of the metal.

Cooling - The molten metal that is poured into the mold will begin to cool and solidify once it enters the cavity. When the entire cavity is filled and the molten metal solidifies the final shape of the casting is formed. The mold can not be opened until the cooling time has elapsed. The desired cooling time can be estimated based upon the wall thickness of the casting and the temperature of the metal. Most of the possible defects that can occur are a result of the solidification process. If some of the molten metal cools too quickly the part may exhibit shrinkage cracks or incomplete sections. Preventative measures can be taken in designing both the part and the mold and will be explored in later sections.

Removal - After the predetermined solidification time has passed the sand mold can simply be broken and the casting removed. This step sometimes called shakeout is typically performed by a vibrating machine that shakes the sand and casting out of the flask. Once removed the casting will likely have some sand and oxide layers adhered to the surface. Shot blasting is sometimes used to remove any remaining sand especially from internal surfaces and reduce the surface roughness.

Trimming - During cooling the material from the channels in the mold solidifies attached to the part. This excess material must be trimmed from the casting either manually via cutting or sawing or using a trimming press. The time required to trim the excess material can be estimated from the size of the casting's envelope. A larger casting will require a longer trimming time. The scrap material that results from this trimming is either discarded or reused in the sand casting process. However the scrap material may need to be reconditioned to the proper chemical composition before it can be combined with non-recycled metal and reused.

 

Red Jambala: Brief Introduction

Jambhala (also known as Dzambhala Dzambala Zambala or Jambala) is the God of Wealth and appropriately a member of the Jewel Family (see Ratnasambhava). He is sometimes equated with the Hindu deity Kubera. Jambhala is also believed to be an emanation of Avalokitesvara or Chenrezig the Bodhisattva of Compassion. There are five different wealth Jambhalas; each has his own practice and mantra to help eliminate poverty and create financial stability.

Gyalten Sogdzin Rinpoche said that Jambhala is the protector of all Lineages and of all sentient beings from all sickness and difficulties. Jambhala is a Bodhisattva of material and spiritual wealth as well as many other things especially of granting financial stability.

”Because in this world there are all kinds of wrathful and negative emotions or bad spirits and sometimes they will harm you and other sentient beings Dzambhala must take on such a wrathful and powerful form to protect us from these harmful spirits and negative karma. Especially Dzambhala helps us minimize or decrease all misfortunes and obstacles and helps us increase all good fortune and happiness.”About Red JambalaRed Jambhala is depicted practising together with his consort the heavenly mother of wealth that is in charge of wealth in the human realm. In ancient times this deity was practiced mainly by kings and royalty. His practice is most suitable to people in high power or to pray for high power for it can attract people wealth and fame. One will enjoy wealth in abundance and shall be well respected and supported by people. There is also the Red Jambhala magnetizing method that can bless the practitioner with marital bliss and a harmonious family.

Red Jambhala is the manifisation of Vajrasattva. He has two faces and four arms and holds a treasury mongoose on his left hand. His Tibetan name is Dzambhala Mapo. Red Jambhala has a red colored body sits in the vajra position with Dakini in front of him. His right leg is panhandle with right foot is above a snail and lotus flower his left leg is bent. He is holding an animal known as Nehulay (mongoose) in his left hand his right hand holding Khorlo (Cakra) the Dakini holding Kapala containing Nectar in her left hand and Norbu Mebar in her right hand. The Mantra of Red Jambhala is:

Om Jambhala Jalendraye Dhanam Medehi Hrih Dakini Jambhala Sambhara Svaha
Some people believe he is the Hindu God of Wealth Ganesha the Red Ganapati and has the head of an elephant. After the rise of Tantric Buddhism Ganesha became a Tantric wealth deity and is known as the "Lord of Provisions in Tibetan Tantrism". According to legend Red Jambhala was in charge of the heavenly treasury that belonged to Lord MahesvaraÂ’s son. Due to his extreme compassion Red Jambhala had unfailingly answered the prayers of many worshippers. Enraged by Red JambhalaÂ’s indiscriminate charity to both the good and evil Dharma guardian Mahakala decapitated him. It was only after the wealth deity repents that Mahakala plants an elephantÂ’s head on his neck and receives him as a retainer.

 

Matra of Red Jambala

Om Dzambhala Dzalim Dzaya Nama Mumei E She E Om Dzajini Dzambhala Dzambhala Svaha
 

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