Handmade Wooden Mini Mask Of Mahakala, Painted White

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Handmade Wooden Mini Mask Of Mahakala, Painted White code: HME22451 Weight : 0.57 Kg(s) size :15x12x8 Cm
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Product TagsHandmade, "Wooden Mask", "Wooden Mini Mask Mahakala", "Craft", "Wood", "Statue", "Wooden Statue"
Country: Nepal

Handmade Wooden Mini Mask Of Mahakala Painted White


Weight: 0.57 kg
Size: 15x12x8 cm
Material: Wood


About the Product


Brief Introduction


Iconography On White Mahakala
The Six-armed Mahakala is favored by the Gelug order of Tibetan Buddhism and in this manifestation is considered to be a fierce and powerful emanation of Avalokiteśvara the bodhisattva of compassion.

He is adorned with the following symbolic attributes:
A crown of five skulls: This is worn by all manifestations of Mahakala and represents the transmutation of the five negative afflictions of human nature into positive virtues.
The Six Arms signify the successful completion of the six perfections which are practiced and brought to perfection by bodhisattvas during the course of their training.
The arms hold various implements each of which has a symbolic significance. The first right hand holds a curved knife. In Mahakala's symbolism the curved knife cuts through the life veins of enemies such as oath-breakers and hindering spirits.

The skull cup in his primary left hand is filled with the heart-blood of these enemies. The crescent shaped chopper of the right hand corresponds in shape to the cavity of the skull cup and functions to make 'mincemeat' of the hearts intestines lungs and life-veins of enemies hostile to the Dharma which are then collected in the skull cup. A similar crescent shaped hand cleaver is used in oriental cuisine to chop meat and dice vegetables.

The next right hand holds a damaru - the hourglass-shaped drum signifying the primordial sound from which is said to have originated all manifested existence. Its rattle is also said to emanate the sound that arouses us from our ignorant state coaxing us on to the path of Dharma.
The uppermost right hand holds a rosary of skulls. The continuous counting of the rosary is a symbol of perpetual activity which Mahakala achieves on a cosmic scale.

Another left hand holds a trident which represents the Three Jewels of Buddhism the Buddha the Dharma and the Sangha.Finally there is the noose for lassoing those of us who have strayed away from the path of the Dharma.

His left leg is outstretched while the right is bent at the knee. The former symbolizes his accomplishments for the benefit of others and the latter those for himself. An elephant-headed entity lying crushed under his legs represents our instinctive primary animal force and urge which when unleashed can prove to be extremely destructive. The sun-disc on which Mahakala stands denotes his illumination of the darkness of ignorance and the lotus on which this disc rests signifies his undefiled purity.

The blazing fire surrounding him demonstrates his powerful energy out to consume all neurotic states of minds. Further his three organs of vision express his ability to see the past present and future. That he stares at the world with wide eyes signifies that he is incensed at the current state of affairs.

Snakes slither across his body as ornaments and also as the scared thread of Brahmins. The writhing serpent is a metaphor for the stirring of our psychic instinctive and primordial energy and Mahakala's wearing them as adornments expresses the fact that rather than impede our spiritual progress such emotions have been tamed and harnessed becoming in the process crowning glories of our spiritual achievements.

About White Mahakala
White Mahakala is rare form of the wrathful Buddhist deity. He is associated with the attainment of wealth. The following description is according to his sadhana:
His body is white. His face is wrathful and he has three eyes. He has six arms. His main right hand holds a wish- fulfilling jewel mounted on a jewel-tipped handle in front of his chest. This emblem is held by deities associated particularly with wealth.

His upper right hand holds a chopper. This crescent-shaped chopper corresponds in shape to the cavity of the skullcup and functions to make 'mincemeat' of the hearts intestines lungs and life-veins of enemies hostile to the Dharma. A similar crescent-shaped hand cleaver is used in oriental cuisine to chop meat and dice vegetables.

His lower right arm holds a hand drum damaru in Sanskrit (Tib. Da ma ru rnga chung). According to the strict rules of Tibetan-Buddhist iconography the damaru is held and played in the right hand and its function is to summon or invoke all of the Buddhas inspiring them with supreme joy. The damaru as held by wrathful and semi-wrathful Buddhist deities is described as being fashioned from the joined skulls of a fifteen or sixteen-year old boy and girl. The left side of the double-skull damaru is drawn smaller to represent the pubescent girl's skull. The magical qualities possessed by these skulls symbolize the virginal ripening to fullness of the male and female bodhichitta essences.

His lower left arm holds a skull-cup with a vase in it filled with many jewels. The skull-cup (Skt. Kapala; Tib. Thod phur)- fashioned from the oval upper section of a human cranium serves as a libation vessel for wrathful and protective Vajrayana deities. As a receptacle for sacrificial offerings presented to wrathful deities the kapala parallels the precious tray or bowl containing auspicious substances like the jewels shown here in this painting.

The central right hand holds a vajra hook. As a hand held weapon the vajra hook symbolizes the hooking of negativities or evil beings and the pulling or driving of all beings out of samsara and towards liberation.

The uppermost left hand holds a trident. As a weapon the trident symbolizes the destruction of the three poisons of ignorance desire and aggression within the three realms. The two prongs uniting in the flaming central prong also symbolize the unity of method and wisdom; the abandonment of the two extremes of samsara and nirvana; and the ultimate union of absolute and relative truth.

He is adorned with jewelled ornaments and wears a beautiful skirt made of many scarves with jewels hanging down on the skirt.

Under each of his foot is a prostrate deity with an elephant head. This is symbolic of Lord Ganesha the Hindu Lord of obstacles thus representing the overcoming of obstacles.

Even though stationary in his stance a lively movement is imparted through the agitated postures of his arms and the "Art-Nouveau" curves of his floating scarves.

The White Mahakala is more unusual than the customary black form. He is especially popular in Mongolia as the main protector deity of Mongolia. given such distinction by the third Dalai Lama.

The teachings of the White Mahakala were brought to Tibet in the eleventh century by Khedrup Khyungpopa who also brought the teachings of the Six-armed Black Mahakala.

Performing the White Mahakala ritual is supposed to bring endless wealth to the needy practitioner in such things as family material goods food power knowledge and spirituality.

Mantra of Mahakala

OM GURU MAHAKALA HARI NI SA SIDDHI DZA



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